Betcha He Ain’t Dancin’ Now: Rich Homie Quan Suing Record Label For $2 Milli In Unpaid Wages

- By Bossip Staff

Rich Homie Quan Leaves Label, Files Lawsuit

Y’all weren’t listening when A Tribe Called Quest told you #IndustryRuleNumber4080? Looks like Rich Homie Quan had to find out the hard way because he is now suing his label, claiming they owe him MILLIONS!!!

Check out the following statement, released today:

Rap star Rich Homie Quan (Dequantes Lamar) today announced that he has filed suit against Girvan Henry, Think It’s A Game Entertainment, LLC (TIG Entertainment) and Fly Merchandise Enterprises, LLC. Rich Homie Quan is seeking more than two million in unpaid earnings from his label and its founder, and has severed ties with Henry and TIG Entertainment+.

According to court documents filed today with the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia, Atlanta Division, (Case No. 1:15-CV-2775-TCB), Quan claims he and TIG Entertainment were engaged in a partnership to sell his music, and that due to breaches of that partnership agreement, he has terminated his partnership with Henry’s TIG Entertainment.

Court documents outline 12-counts that claim Henry has not accounted for, nor paid monies earned by Quan, including royalties, for at least four albums, which featured songs including “Flex” and RIAA Gold Certified, international hit “Type of Way.” The suit names Def Jam Recordings via a partnership with Henry, and Trinidad James’ record label, Gold Gang Music Group, LLC, by which Def Jam paid Henry and Gold Gang $550,000 and distributed “Type of Way.” Quan says Henry and Gold Gang had no rights to the song’s masters and he never signed a record deal with Def Jam or Gold Gang.

The claim also states that Henry misappropriated funds garnered from Def Jam for “Type of Way” when Henry purchased property in Atlanta (244 Peters St., Atlanta, Ga.) with said money.

In addition, Quan claims that Henry, through Fly Merchandise Enterprises, LLC fraudulently claimed ownership of a logo that included Quan’s name and Henry profited from the use of that logo.

Henry misrepresented ownership of Rich Homie Quan’s name, likeness and logo marks by filing two trademark applications with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (U.S. Reg. Nos. 4,483,756 and 4,746,133).

Quan’s litigation attorney, Leron Rogers, a partner at Lewis, Brisbois, Bisgaard & Smith LLP Attorneys, stated: “Unfortunately this is a classic case of a music artist being ripped off by those claiming to have his best interest in mind. Quan has more than delivered on his part of the partnership, delivering hit songs that have sold hundreds of thousands of copies. Mr. Henry has taken advantage of Quan, and now it’s time for him to receive his just due.”

Co-Counsel, Brianna Williams of Mélange, a Williams Firm, echoed Mr. Rogers’ sentiments stating, “Quan has worked really hard to achieve his vision of becoming a successful artist. He deserves to be compensated in a fair and just manner. While it is unfortunate that he has had to seek resolution of this issue through the legal system, we fully expect that justice will prevail.”

Damn, if this is true we hope this brother gets the money owed to him! He has a kid to feed!

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