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It’s hard to imagine that former reality star Tim Norman won’t soon be facing a life-long reality behind bars now that he’s the last defendant who’s still claiming innocence in the 2016 murder of Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s star Andre Montgomery Jr.

 

Tim Norman

Source: MADISON COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI DETENTION CENTER / Official Mugshot

Last month, we reported that the man who said he was hired by Norman to shoot and kill Montgomery, Travell Anthony Hill, pleaded guilty in court and was convicted on multiple counts for the conspiracy and commission of the murder. Now, two more co-defendants in the case have pleaded guilty and implicated Norman as the mastermind behind the heinous crime.

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According to the Saint Louis Post-DispatchTerica Ellis and Waiel Rebhi Yaghnam pleaded guilty Friday to conspiring to commit murder-for-hire.

As previously reported, Normon is accused of hiring Ellis, an exotic dancer whom he previously dated, to lure Montgomery to his death at the hands of Hill, who implicated Normon and Ellis when he pleaded guilty to the murder.

From the Post-Dispatch:

Norman had asked Ellis about Montgomery during a stay at the Chase Park Plaza Royal Sonesta St. Louis, telling her he was looking for Montgomery and needed help to find him. Ellis, knowing Norman was “going to take some form of action” against Montgomery, still agreed to help, prosecutors said.

In the days leading up to the murder, Ellis told Montgomery she was planning to be in St. Louis. On March 13, the day before the killing, Norman flew to St. Louis from Los Angeles. The next day, Ellis used a burner phone to talk to Montgomery, find out where he was, and call Norman.

Ellis’ phone placed her in the vicinity of Montgomery’s murder when he was shot around 8 p.m. March 14, 2016, in the 3900 block of Natural Bridge Drive.

Right after the killing, Ellis made another phone call to Norman and then started driving toward Memphis. Norman later paid Ellis $10,000 in cash for her help. Ellis banked more than $9,000 over the next two days in three separate deposits into two bank accounts.

That alone is a lot of damning evidence, but there’s more.

Yaghnam who worked in life insurance after working in the music industry for years and even producing Nelly’s 2002 album “Nellyville”—admitted as part of his plea agreement that he helped Norman obtain a $200,000 life insurance policy on Montgomery in 2014. Now, how an uncle can just get a life insurance policy on his nephew without raising any red flags is beyond me—especially when that policy “stipulated a $200,000 payout if Montgomery died of something other than natural causes, as well as a $50,000 payout if he died within the next 10 years,” according to the Post-Dispatch.
But it was never paid out anyway because Norman and Yaghnam failed to deliver all the necessary paperwork.

Still, 16 days after Montgomery was killed, Yaghnam tried to collect on this policy that just screamed “We murdered this guy!”

But despite all of this evidence, Norman’s attorney, Michael Leonard, says he and his client, “fully intend to proceed to trial” this September.

“We fully expect the government is not going to be able to meet their burden of proof beyond a reasonable doubt,” Leonard said, according to Riverfront Times.

Yeeeeah—-—good luck with that. My money’s on a well-deserved guilty verdict.

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