Meet The Ladies Of UMC’s “Beyond The Pole”

- By Bossip Staff
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Beyond The Pole

Source: UMC / She’s A Movement Media Group

‘Beyond The Pole’ Cast Talks To BOSSIP

If you haven’t already heard of the Urban Movie Channel’s new show “Beyond The Pole” it’s not too late to catch up! The show, which follows the lives of current and retired exotic dancers in Atlanta is executive produced by Mark Stevens and Shante Paige.

Watch the clip below, then hit the flip to get the scoop on some of the leading ladies.

What did you think? You can download the UMC app or sign up for a free trial on the UMC.tv website.

Beyond The Pole

Source: UMC / She’s A Movement Media Group

MS. DIME

How old were you when you started dancing?

I was about 20/21 years old when I first started dancing.

What is the biggest lesson you learned as a dancer?

The biggest lesson I learned was nothing lasts forever. Club friendships, meeting men thinking they’ll love you, the money you make, all of it is temporary unless you have a strategy to make it permanent.

Did you have a plan in mind for when you wanted to stop?

Yeah, I had a plan. But I also had a plan to never dance. Needless to say, things don’t go as planned so you have to re-strategize with whatever circumstances come your way.

What’s been your worst experience?

My worst experiences came with all the fights I had. Whenever I got upset or felt disrespected, I would blank all the way out. I would fight girls left and right and didn’t care about the circumstances.

I was banned from one club because I got into a fight with a girl. She lost and she didn’t like it. She came back to the club later that night with her boyfriend to try and fight me. While I was walking to my car, something told me to unlock my car door and get in. Once I grabbed my car door to open it, they jumped out and tried to sneak up on me. They had been parked right by my car. I always kept my gun right in arms reach because dudes would rob dancers all the time and I never wanted to be in a situation where I was robbed or raped. I grabbed my gun and started shooting at the dude which resulted in me getting banned from the club and almost going to jail. It was self defense so I was good, but the experience taught me that you always have to be aware of your surroundings (including the security guards). They’ll do anything for extra cash so if they’ve been paid to let a person get to you, they’ll let things happen to you as if they didn’t know.

Beyond The Pole

Source: UMC / She’s A Movement Media Group

What’s the difference being a dancer in Atlanta vs other cities?

I’m from Miami, so in Miami we worked way harder than Atlanta dancers. Miami clubs don’t have rules. They’ll let guys do anything to you if they got a check. It’s like the customer can do no wrong unless he physically hits a female. But they can slap your ass, record you, curse you out, and still don’t get put out. Miami girls don’t back down, so we’ll curse them back out. But you’ll have some managers that will suspend you or fire you depending on how important a customer is to the club.

In Atlanta, they don’t tolerate that type of stupidity. One thing I loved about working at Blue Flame Lounge in Atlanta is that they didn’t tolerate a customer disrespecting their girls. They were always respectful of our privacy and they didn’t allow customers to record girls while they were on stage. If they were caught recording, they got put out. In Atlanta, customers had to pay you at lease twenty dollars to get naked on stage meaning you’re not looking at nothing for free. I preferred dancing in Atlanta when I got older because it was less work and more privacy.

What can you teach others beyond the pole?

I come from so many different backgrounds. There isn’t anything I think I couldn’t teach. My first rule would always be get paid, stack your money, and become your own boss. Make a plan. Don’t just say you’re going to do it. Actually do it. Stop procrastinating. Follow your own goals and dreams. I don’t care who’s doing it or who started it. If that’s what you want to do, add your own spin and make it your own. Don’t let dream killers kill your dreams. There’s enough money out here for everybody. College isn’t for everyone so don’t let someone talk you into going to college if that’s not your passion. Take up a trade and pursue your dreams. Why would you go to college to get a degree to work for someone or run another millionaire’s business when you can take up a trade and run your own business?

How has filming Beyond the Pole changed your perspective?

Filming Beyond the Pole hasn’t changed my perspective because I was already open minded on the life style and the opinions of how others may feel about it. I want Beyond the Pole to enlighten people on what the industry is actually like and what might cause someone to get caught up in that life rather than what they’ve heard or seen in movies.

I want people to see me and watch my journey and see that every girl that dances isn’t dumb or uneducated. There are all kinds of women in this industry or who have been in the industry before starting their professional careers. Some are nurses, teachers, professors, doctors, lawyers, etc. The only difference is they just didn’t disclose to the world that they used to dance because they’re afraid of how they’ll be judged by their peers.

LING LING

How old were you when you started dancing?

I started too young but too old, a lady never reveals her age 😁😂

What is the biggest lesson you learned as a dancer?

One of the biggest lessons I learned was to never let your guard down, always have tough skin, and be your only friend! Did you have a plan in mind for when you wanted to stop? Yes. Once I get comfortable enough financially and comfortably invested into my other business, I’ll transition out. What’s been your worst experience? One of my worst experiences dancing would have to be being humiliated in front of a whole NFL team; being called not good enough, not thick enough, being told I do not have big enough boobs, and that I wasn’t worth spending money on.

Another time, I was sitting in the strip club I worked at having a drink before going home and I was roofied (drugged). Someone managed to carry me to the back office and watch over me but it was a seriously scary night.

What’s the difference being a dancer in Atlanta vs other cities?

The difference for me being a dancer in Atlanta vs other places is Atlanta is very cutthroat. There is a lot of competition and you battle daily. Real bodies vs fake bodies, it’s very hard. In Atlanta, it’s all about who you know and how big your butt is for the most part. Every other state and city I’ve danced in, it’s more about your stage routine, your performance, your look and personality.

What can you teach others beyond the pole?

Well there’s so much I can teach others from inside the club to outside the club. I come from another country, a third world country to be exact. I was raised in the hood in California and grew up in the foster care system. I have a lot of knowledge from those experiences, both good and bad. Lessons that I’ve learned and lessons I’m still learning. I want to help keep people from making the same mistakes I have or help them through the path I once walked.

How has filming Beyond the Pole changed your perspective?

Filming Beyond the Pole changed my perspective in many ways. It’s changed how I see certain women, how I judge someone’s character, how I look at different outcomes. Mainly, I realized that everyone in the show, and in this lifestyle overall, has to have a lot of courage.

Beyond The Pole

Source: UMC / She’s A Movement Media Group

ANGEL KAKE

How old were you when you started dancing?

I was 19 when I started dancing.

What is the biggest lesson you learned as a dancer?

The biggest lesson I learned was to be humble. After I first stopped, I thought I had graduated from stripper college and felt like the girls who were still in the club were beneath me. God humbled me when it came time for me to pull those platform stilettos back out.

Did you have a plan in mind for when you wanted to stop?

My initial plan was to dance until I got an apartment and then a car. After I reached those goals, I didn’t quite have the confidence to begin something new. Eventually, I met a football player who made me choose between going to school or staying in the game. From there, I decided to go to school in LA and train to become a makeup artist.

What’s the difference being a dancer in Atlanta vs other cities?

I’ve danced in New York, DC, Miami, LA and Vegas. There is no other city like Atlanta. Atlanta is the Mecca for the strip club industry. In most other cities, people don’t respect the hustle of it all. People will look down on you if they know you dance.

What can you teach others beyond the pole?

This industry teaches you to have tough skin. You become appreciative of the skills you learn that help you thrive like staying in shape, looking the part, marketing yourself, etc.

How has filming Beyond the Pole changed your perspective?

Beyond the Pole was a call from God. It showed me that you have a purpose. It taught me that we have to take advantage of each and every opportunity because you never know what might come from it. This was my first time doing reality tv and because my life is hectic, all I was worried about was how I didn’t have time. Working, being a mom, and then shooting the show was limiting. But with the show, I gained the confidence to share things and was forced to accept myself for who I am – something that took me over 30 years to do.

Stormy Wellington Beyond The Pole

Source: UMC / She’s A Movement Media Group

STORMY WELLINGTON

How old were you when you started dancing?

I was introduced to the life at 13. I started dancing at 16.

What is the biggest lesson you learned as a dancer?

You have to get in and get out or the club will eat you up and swallow your potential and purpose.

Did you have a plan in mind for when you wanted to stop?

No. I just knew I didn’t want to make a career out of it!

What’s been your worst experience?

My worst experience was flying to another state to dance and making NO money. I actually ended up owing and spending money!

How has filming Beyond the Pole changed your perspective?

I now sympathize with girls behind the pole because I realize that they are lost. I will be more patient if they don’t strike a nerve and bring out Stormy from the Block. That b**ch is crazy!

LEA LEA

How old were you when you started dancing?

I was grown and on my own when I started dancing.

What is the biggest lesson you learned as a dancer?

What you do doesn’t have to be who you are.

Did you have a plan in mind for when you wanted to stop?

I had a plan in mind but life had another plan in mind. So, now I am just going with the flow, living life one day at a time while simultaneously preparing for anything life throws my way.

What’s been your worst experience?

Dealing with everyone on the outside looking in with their assumptions, judging, and intolerance while simultaneously telling you to be you and live your life.

What’s the difference being a dancer in Atlanta vs other cities?

In my opinion, there is only a difference between being a dancer in the south and a dancer in the north, not Atlanta vs other cities.

What can you teach others beyond the pole?

I can teach people a lot if they are willing to learn. A more accurate question would be, what do others want to learn from me beyond the pole?

How has filming Beyond the Pole changed your perspective?

It hasn’t changed mine at all. I have always seen beyond the pole.

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