We Stan A Black Queen: RihRih Flosses Her Fenty Drip For T Magazine Feature

- By Bossip Staff
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Rihanna

Source: 247Paps.TV/ SplashNews / Splash News

Rihanna Talks About Her New LVMH Line

RihRih’s

on the cover of the new issue of T Magazine AND she’s wearing her new Fenty LVMH collection for the feature story.

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Exclusive: A first look at #Rihanna's new fashion line @Fenty, created in partnership with #LVMH. For her next act, the pop star will become the first black woman in charge of a major luxury fashion house in Paris. Here, @badgalriri opens up about what this means to her: ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “You’re going to be black wherever you go. And I don’t know if it’s unfortunate or fortunate, because I love being black. So, sorry for those who don’t like it — that’s the first thing you see before you even hear my voice. There are also other factors: I’m young. I’m new to the family. I’m a woman. Those factors do come into play, but I will not apologize for them, and I will not back down from being a woman, from being black, from having an opinion. I’m running a company and that’s exactly what I came here to do. I don’t know if it makes people uncomfortable or not, but that’s not even my business, you know? I do know that the reason I’m here is not because I’m black. It’s because of what I have to offer. That’s what they’re invested in. And the fact that I’m black is just that: a fact.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Click the link in our bio for Rihanna's full conversation with the playwright @JeremyOHarris, and to see more exclusive images of her new clothing line. Photographed by @KristinLeeMoolman, styled by @SuzanneKoller, makeup by @lauren.parsons, hair by Yusef (@yusefhairnyc), manicure by Jenny Longworth (@jennynails), set design by Andrew Tomlinson (@tomotattle).

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Rihanna and T Magazine posted on Instagram to promote the story, which discusses her new collaboration with LVMH, her quest to be size and color inclusive with her brands and even some discussion of new music.

We picked a few excerpts for your reading pleasure.

Via T. Magazine:

JH: Using your family name as the anchor of this company and Fenty Beauty seems to recall the idea of a family business. What was behind that choice?

RF: I used to be afraid to step into the whole celebrity makeup world. I saw brands like Hilary Duff and Hannah Montana23 have so much success [in the aughts], but it got to a place where they were so oversaturated in the market that it diluted their personal brands. It made me think, “I’m not going to do this, because you lose your respect and credibility,” and so every collaboration I did outside of music, I used Fenty so that you didn’t have to hear the word “Rihanna” every time you saw something that I did. So Rihanna stayed the music, the person. But these other brands are called Fenty.

JH: Is it true you are doing a reggae album?

RF: Yeah.

JH: Do you have any names under consideration?

RF: No, so far it’s just been R9,31 thanks to the Navy. I’m about to call it that probably, ’cause they have haunted me with this “R9, R9, when is R9 coming out?” How will I accept another name after that’s been burned into my skull?

There you have it — R9 the reggae album. Rihanna says she’s not sure when it will drop — but we’re excited, aren’t you?

Hit the flip for more from the interview.

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@tmagazine

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H: You are one of our only immigrant pop stars in America, 21 Savage32 being another. Did coming from an island that’s 90 percent black make it feel natural to have 40 distinct shades in the first run of Fenty Beauty?

RF: In my own household, my father is half black, half white. My mom is black from South America. I was seeing diversity. That’s all I knew. Growing up, I wanted to be darker, always. So, making makeup, it wasn’t even a thing I had to think about. I didn’t even really know how bad it was, the void in the market for dark foundation, because all I’d seen was black women put makeup on. I don’t even think 40 shades is enough! And so I added 10 more recently, and we’re not gonna stop there.

JH: A few years ago, you started going on a “thicc” journey.33 How did that change how you looked at inclusivity with regard to your fashion line?

RF: It just changed how I dress in terms of my proportions. You wear what looks good on you and that’s it. I’m thick and curvy right now, and so if I can’t wear my own stuff then, I mean, that’s not gonna work, right? And my size is not the biggest size. It’s actually closer to the smallest size we have: We go up to a [French size] 46. We’re saying we can meet you at any one drop that we put out.

We love Thicc RihRih — and the fact that she’s making clothes for different shapes!

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@tmagazine

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JH: I can’t get over the fact that, you know, the fashion industry is historically so explicitly white, it’s so racist, it’s so classist and it’s so sexist. Have there been moments where, as a black woman, you’ve felt like an outsider in this space? Or does being Rihanna alleviate that?

RF: It’s never alleviated, you know? You’re going to be black wherever you go. And I don’t know if it’s unfortunate or fortunate, because I love being black. So, sorry for those who don’t like it — that’s the first thing you see before you even hear my voice. There are also other factors: I’m young. I’m new to the family. I’m a woman. Those factors do come into play, but I will not apologize for them, and I will not back down from being a woman, from being black, from having an opinion. I’m running a company and that’s exactly what I came here to do. I don’t know if it makes people uncomfortable or not, but that’s not even my business, you know? I do know that the reason I’m here is not because I’m black. It’s because of what I have to offer. That’s what they’re invested in. And the fact that I’m black is just that: a fact.

This is our favorite quote from the whole story. We love it that Rihanna is so unapologetically blackity black black.

JH: What else are you afraid of? Do you hold fear at all?

RF: I am afraid of being afraid, because I know that means it’s wrong. If I feel fear, that means it’s not right.

JH: Did you feel fear when it came to working with LVMH and Arnault?

RF: No, I got this pressure to not let Arnault down. I felt like this is a moment in history that I have to live up to. This is my one shot and I only get one time to do it and it can’t be wrong. But I did get fear one time in my life, I can’t remember exactly about what: I remember my mom saying, like, “I see something in your eyes I’ve never seen before.” And I was like, “What?” And she was like, “Fear.” And I started crying. So any time I get that anxiety feeling, I literally try to shove it right back down to nothing.

No wonder she comes across so fearless! Are you gonna cop from that first Fenty drop?

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